Guiding Principles for Tricky Performance Issues

Guiding Principles for Tricky Performance Issues
By Paul Clifford

Performance management is not an activity many look forward to, regardless of what your role is in the process. I think the crux of the issue for many is the fear of giving and receiving negative feedback. Performance management can be even more challenging when the person’s overall performance falls below expected standards. The challenge ratchets up another notch when a sensitive issue is involved such as suspicions that a physical or mental health issue may be a contributing factor. It’s in these situations that managers really earn their money.

Unfortunately few managers feel completely comfortable that they have the skills and knowledge to navigate these situations. Many feel anywhere from unsure to terrified and many seek guidance on what to do. If managers do suspect that a physical or mental health issue may be at play in a performance management situation, a useful course of action is to avoid getting too bogged down in the nuances of the situation and instead take a step back and apply some key principles.

... more info

Career Limiting Moves: Habits that undermine employee performance

Career Limiting Moves: Habits that undermine employee performance
By Paul Clifford

Every day that we go to work we have an opportunity to make our mark on the world.  It may only be a small mark for many of us – very few of us get to be the PM or win a peace prize – but the opportunity exists to make things better for ourselves and/or for others; to achieve purpose and meaning. 

The way we approach our day is critical to our success.  Exhibiting the behaviours that result in success is not always clear, nor easy to implement.   Sometimes we have to go through a personal change process to overcome our habits and develop a new set of productive behaviours.  So what are some of the habits that many of us need to overcome if we are to secure success in the modern workplace?   

... more info

70:20:10 Rhetoric or Reality? – Part 2 Solutions

70:20:10 Rhetoric or Reality? – Part 2 Solutions

In Part 1 of 70:20:10 Rhetoric or Reality? we asked the question “What’s stopping the rollout of true 70:20:10 programs?”  We identified a number of blockers as we lamented at the large number of learning programs that continue to be dominated by workshop led learning. 
In Part 2 we ask the question – what should L&D professionals and line managers do differently to overcome the blockers and enable the roll out of true 70:20:10 programs?  

more info

70:20:10 Rhetoric or Reality?

70:20:10 Rhetoric or Reality?

70:20:10 is a ratio that most L&D professionals would be very familiar with.  It’s a guideline formula that many organisations apply to the design of learning programs.  The trouble is it’s not often used as intended or to its full potential.

70:20:10 comes out of the research that suggests, for optimal learning outcomes, 70% of the learning should take place on the job, 20% through so called social learning such as coaching and mentoring and 10% via formal classroom learning.

... more info

Leveraging Purpose to Drive Engagement

Leveraging Purpose to Drive Engagement

Ask yourself: When you begin your work day, do you focus on what you are there to achieve (your purpose) or the things to have to do (your tasks)?

Research tells us that a significant proportion of the Australian workforce is not fully engaged. Recent studies by BlessingWhite and the Gallup Organisation put the figure at around 60% non-engagement in Australia & New Zealand. This is important to recognise because engagement is a proven metric of organisational performance – directly relatable to factors such as customer ratings, profitability, productivity, turnover and absenteeism. At FBG we see that a significant contributor to these high non-engagement scores is the disconnect employees feel from the vision and purpose of their organisation. Often they have a limited sense of their impact and how their work connects to its wider aims and goals. As such we can’t possibly expect optimal performance when very few employees have the requisite knowledge to make good choices that align with purpose.

... more info